There’s one well-known proverb we’d like to begin our post with. Like father, like son. But to make it more actual, let us make some changes. Like father, like daughter.

Today we’d like to tell you more about Joanna Pousette-Dart, an American artist, known for her shaped paintings. She was born in April 1947, in New York City, New York to abstract expressionist painter and founding member of the New York School of painting, Richard Pousette-Dart. As you can understand, in her early years, Joanna spent quite a lot of time at her father’s studio, working there, drawing, watching his processes, listening to music and talking. It couldn’t but influence her desire to become an artist.

In 1968, Joanna Pousette-Dart received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Bennington College. There she was mainly surrounded by Greenbergian Formalists Kenneth Noland and Jules Olitski. Despite this traditional modernist background, she managed to develop her own style that is quite far from conventional painting.

First of all, Pousette-Dart’s shaped paintings are unique in their melding of formal and poetic concerns. They take their inspiration from many different sources: Islamic, Chinese, Mozarabic and Mayan art, among others.

As you may have noticed, Joanna Pousette-Dart’s paintings take various forms, each with their own dynamic sense of expansion and compression. The painted contours of the internal forms create additional complexity, sometimes repeating the contours of the canvas, and sometimes challenging them. While the paintings are perceived as a whole, the rhythm and light of the painting are intended to reverberate beyond its curved edges.

Currently, Lisson Gallery holds the exhibition of recent paintings and works on paper by Joanna Pousette-Dart. But as you can understand, due to the ongoing spread of COVID-19, the gallery is closed. However, we are sure that this mayhem will end soon, and you’ll be able to visit many other Pousette-Dart’s exhibitions.

If you want to learn more about the artist, please, visit prabook.com.

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